Inanitah: Tantra, Community and Yoga in Nicaragua

Posted by in Yoga on the Road

The average hippie traveling through Central America, has heard something along the way of Inanitah, but few have actually trekked to Ometepe to see it for themselves.

What is it exactly? It’s a permaculture community-i.e. it’s a sustainable community moving towards completely closed loop systems. They have compost toilets, cobb built housing and communal buildings; they’re cooking food on open fire and powering a hot tub with fire as well; they are using their water storage as a fresh water pool for guests part of the week and above all, they have one of the most hyper local kitchens I have ever had the pleasure to eat at-everything in Inanitah’s kitchen (except for the garlic of course) comes from within 1KM of the community. What Inanitah doesn’t grow on their property, they buy seasonally from local farmers on the island.

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It’s also a Tantra community, which means that daily morning meditations are skewed towards more movement, OSHO and tantric based traditions. It’s also a yogic community in the way that they eat (conscious eating, infusing food with love from farm to table and gratitude) as well as daily asana classes in the temple.

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(Yoga in the Temple)

 

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(The Jungle House Space)

The location is king. Located on Ometepe, a volcanic island in the middle of Lake Nicaragua on the West Coast of Nicaragua, this place has incredible energy. Being that it’s an island of extremes-Conception, the active, fiery volcano at one end and Maderas, the watery, dormant one on the other side; the energy of the two pull on each other creating a very Yin environment for travellers. Many many people come to the island and get stomach bugs the first week they arrive, they’re bodies literally letting go of all the Yang energy that we’re so infiltrated with in most of our home countries. Gringos complain of the water-it’s a gringo thing (cause most of this side of the island drinks pure spring water filtered naturally), fear that nature is attacking them, but usually it’s when visitors stick around for  month or more that they start to notice how desperately their bodies NEEDED that cleanse/balance/retreat.

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Inanitah is above and beyond a place of work. You can come visit for a minimum of a month for volunteers (15 hour s a week, $450 a month and includes a camp site, meals, yoga etc) or a minimum of 10 days for visitors ($24 a day for ten days includes all the previous mentioned fun). They host a lot of work shops from Shamanic Healing to a 3 week Tantric Cycle that can be taken as individual pods or as all three weeks, to Eco Village Design courses. Also, people come to Inanitah to work on their garbage. I certainly have trucked tons of it through there just to sort and rid myself of what was no longer needed. So even for volunteers, it’s a place of both external and internal work and the incredible vortex of Ometepe both supports it and helps to dig a little deeper to the root.

I’ve been coming back to Inanitah over the last year-3 times in total. I can’t help myself. Every time I drag my ass up the drive way, hanging by one blubbering thread, I get the shadow and the light served to me immediately. The light is in the food-you will never taste food made without night shades or onions that’s this good; you can literally TASTE the LOVE in the fresh picked greens and the views; my god, the views at Inanitah make you feel three inches from touching the Divine right in her sweet spot. And the dark: OSHO’s Dynamic Meditation in the morning will get all the dust you thought you settled churned up so you can purge it out. I once blacked out in a mediation, my body was running away so hard. And I broke out in hives once in a Tantric Week too.

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I know there is magic in that space, because I always try to run away. And then drag my butt back, like a fugitive caught on the highway just outside of the Penn ready to suit up and do the work. I have had the pleasure of taking courses, volunteering and guesting at Inanitah over the past year-several times each. They have an incredible library, a beautiful spirit and hearts so big, sometimes the love alone will make you cry. But also know that this is not the ideal you have read about in some fairy tale book about how hippies never fight and everything in alternative communities runs on rainbows and sparkle farts. This is a place where the darkness is nestled comfortably right against the light-the only difference is, no one is pretending there isn’t a gorgeously weirdo elephant in the room.

Do yourself a favour, go soon.